Fish Farming in Nigeria

Elementary Aquaculture
October 2, 2018
Fish Feed Ingredients
February 19, 2019
Elementary Aquaculture
October 2, 2018
Fish Feed Ingredients
February 19, 2019

Aquaculture (fish farming) in Nigeria is a sub-sector Agriculture. It is currently still in the developmental stage from my experience. In my 10 years of practicing aquaculture in Nigeria and few West African countries like Cotonou, Togo and Ghana, I can confidently say aquaculture is still in its developmental stage. The key reason why growth in the aquaculture sub-sector is slow can be attributed mainly to lack of necessary support by the government. This explains why over 75% of aquaculture farmers still operate at a subsistence level. The remaining percentage is mostly private investors with huge amount of investment to put in the business. I started this business (Simwaaz Fisheries) in person in the year 2008 with fish seed (fingerlings) breeding and supply to different parts of the country, so I think I do know little that can be talked about fish farming in Nigeria.

Discussing further, fish farming in Nigeria is mainly carried out in earthen and concrete ponds depending on which suits your environment and purpose. Fish feed covers about 75% of any aquaculture investment, which happens to be one of the key hindrances to the supposed rapid growth we need in the agriculture sub-sector. Presently, we use both imported and locally manufactured fish feed in Nigeria .In the year 2016, there was a surge in the price of both imported and local fish feed brand which was a ripple effect of government policies in the country. By this, I mean foreign exchange to import both finished fish feed and raw materials (like fish meal, additives to manufacture local fish feed had to increase over 50%. Aquaculture in Nigeria is an industry given birth to without standardization, so there are no specified standard on how to go about fish farming in the country. Presently, fish farming is strongest in the South-Western part (Erinwe community, Ijebu, Ogun State) of Nigeria. However, practice has greatly increased in the Eastern and Northern part of the country. Fish species mainly cultured in Nigeria is the catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and now Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is also gaining acceptance gradually, which is mostly cultured in cages (cage culture). Key part of our value addition is processing i.e. smoke catfish and tilapia.

Aquaculture (fish farming) in Nigeria is a sub-sector Agriculture. It is currently still in the developmental stage from my experience. In my 10 years of practicing aquaculture in Nigeria and few West African countries like Cotonou, Togo and Ghana, I can confidently say aquaculture is still in its developmental stage. The key reason why growth in the aquaculture sub-sector is slow can be attributed mainly to lack of necessary support by the government. This explains why over 75% of aquaculture farmers still operate at a subsistence level. The remaining percentage is mostly private investors with huge amount of investment to put in the business. I started this business (Simwaaz Fisheries) in person in the year 2008 with fish seed (fingerlings) breeding and supply to different parts of the country, so I think I do know little that can be talked about fish farming in Nigeria.

Discussing further, fish farming in Nigeria is mainly carried out in earthen and concrete ponds depending on which suits your environment and purpose. Fish feed covers about 75% of any aquaculture investment, which happens to be one of the key hindrances to the supposed rapid growth we need in the agriculture sub-sector. Presently, we use both imported and locally manufactured fish feed in Nigeria .In the year 2016, there was a surge in the price of both imported and local fish feed brand which was a ripple effect of government policies in the country. By this, I mean foreign exchange to import both finished fish feed and raw materials (like fish meal, additives to manufacture local fish feed had to increase over 50%. Aquaculture in Nigeria is an industry given birth to without standardization, so there are no specified standard on how to go about fish farming in the country. Presently, fish farming is strongest in the South-Western part (Erinwe community, Ijebu, Ogun State) of Nigeria. However, practice has greatly increased in the Eastern and Northern part of the country. Fish species mainly cultured in Nigeria is the catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and now Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is also gaining acceptance gradually, which is mostly cultured in cages (cage culture). Key part of our value addition is processing i.e. smoke catfish and tilapia.